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Crimes In Northern Burma

The report presents data collected from a Partners investigation in southern Kachin State, northern Burma in October 2011. The testimony of witnesses and on-site photographs reveal multiple acts perpetrated by Burma Army battalions 74 and 276 against ethnic Kachin civilians. These acts include torture, extrajudicial killing, the specific targeting of civilians, human shielding, unlawful arrest, unlawful detention, forced labor, forced relocation, displacement, property theft, and property destruction.

Considering the nature and scale of these acts in combination with documented abuses in the broader civil war in Kachin State, the actions of the Burma government and the Burma Army may amount to war crimes and also other serious violations, including crimes against humanity.

Presented at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand, the report generated widespread attention among journalists, scholars, advocates, and governments worldwide. The full report can be found archived as a supporting document at The New York Times.

Crimes In Northern Burma

Researcher, Writer and Photographer, 2011

Nam Lim Pa, Burma/Myanmar

The report presents data collected during a Partners investigation in southern Kachin State, northern Burma in October 2011. The testimony of witnesses and on-site photographs reveal multiple acts perpetrated by Burma Army battalions 74 and 276 against ethnic Kachin civilians. These acts include torture, extrajudicial killing, the specific targeting of civilians, human shielding, unlawful arrest, unlawful detention, forced labor, forced relocation, displacement, property theft, and property destruction.

Considering the nature and scale of these acts in combination with documented abuses in the broader civil war in Kachin State, the actions of the Burma government and the Burma Army may amount to war crimes and also other serious violations, including crimes against humanity.

Presented at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand, the report generated widespread attention among journalists, researchers, advocates, and governments worldwide.

The full report can be found archived as a supporting document at The New York Times.